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Books and movies - But here in my heart, I give you the best of my love.

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November 25th, 2007


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11:21 pm - Books and movies

Your five favourite books, in order:
[this is always a bit of a toss up, but here's today's desert island list]

1. The Stone and the Flute by Hans Bemmann
2. The Magician's Nephew by C.S. Lewis
3. Through the Looking Glass by Lewis Carol
4. Sharpe's Eagle by Bernard Cornwell
5. The Mystery of the Stuttering Parrot by Robert Arthur

A book that you thought you were going to hate and ended up liking:
Why would I read it if I thought I would hate it? I honestly can't think of anything like this. The other way, that's easily believed.

A book that you love even though you're kind of embarrassed to admit it:
The Baroness Series. It's dreadfully trashy. It follows the live of the Baroness Penelope St. John Orsini. Socialite, world-renown fashion model, owner of her own modelling company, of which she is the flagship asset, and super-spy known only as "coin" a brilliantly witty (in the author's mind), but completely mystifying (to the character's seeking to learn the identify of the mysterious "coin", known only to "key", the Baroness's business manager, who's identify is known only to...I forget who, but only one person, not even THE PRESIDENT HIMSELF knows who "key" and "coin" are. And that's the way he wants it. That's the only way they can accomplish their jobs. etc. etc.) She's the spoiled diva daughter of a Philadelphia blue-blood family, married a senator but was widowed when her sekret super-spy senator died on a mission. Then she married a race-car, daredevil Baron, from whom she takes her title. Every book features the following randomly compiled elements. The top secret chiefs of staff type meeting in which someone tells whoever it is to "turn the key" to "activate coin." Key calling Coin, inevitably shocking her on her elaborately described watch while she's having a random hookup with some random dude with her natural athleticism on conspicuous display. Some randomly inserted animals who are apparently tangential to the plot. The briefing with her team and the discussion of all their brilliantly inventive overkill equipment. The capture of the Baroness and the gender-based humiliation/torture of her, that she escapes from to kill the villian, save the day and maintain her secret identify. Yeah. That's believable. And yet, I still like them.

A book you liked without even understanding why you did:
The Pilgrim's Progress by John Bunyon. I haven't finished it yet, but I love it. It delights me.

A book you've wanted to read for ages but haven't gotten around to yet:
*sigh* Ages, huh. It would have to be a classic then. Something that's been around for ages. How about The Man in the Iron Mask by Alexandre Dumas. I've been dying to read it, but I won't permit myself to read it as it's the third book of a trilogy containing the Vicomte de Bragglione, Louise de Vallier, and concluding with The Man in the Iron Mask. I've read book I, and I've stared book two, but to say it's deadly dull is doing "dull" a disservice. I'll get through it eventually. I will say this about that. Alexandre Dumas was totally the V.C. Andrews of his time.

A book you were totally obsessed with at some point (or still are!):
The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand. Don't we all go through an Ayn Rand phase? Mine was when I was about 15 and it was based around this book. I was not the Atlas Shrugged type.

A book that you couldn't put down, no matter how late it was:
Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card

A book that you end up rereading every time you pick it up:
There are a lot of books like that. Because I'm constantly tidying up books, there are always some that don't make it back onto the shelf, and I end up reading them, and so they have to move to the shelf later, but when I touch them again...well suffice it to say, it's unusual to find any C.S. Lewis or Robert Arthur books on an actual bookshelf.

A book that gave you chills:
Rose Madder by Stephen King

A book you haven't reread or thought about in a while but really liked:
If I haven't thought about it, why would it suddenly spring to mind on command. "You brain. Think of a book that you liked by haven't thought of in awhile!" Let's go with the Jill Murphy "Worst Witch" books. I haven't read them in awhile.

A book that you'd love to see made into a movie:
I've always wanted to see a proper James Bond mini-series that follows the books. Those book are incredible and they really get lost in the movies. Not for nothing was this JFK's favorite series. I guess that's not a movie though. I'll just pick a random book, then. Janice in Tomorrowland by Emory Holloway. Not bloody likely, but it would be cool.

If you could go into any book and live in its world, the one you'd choose:
Probably Harry Potter. That's what makes it so fun to roleplay in.

Your favourite literary character of all time:
Robert Lovelace from Clarissa by Samuel Richardson.

The character you'd marry, if you could:
Good manners would dictate that I answer with the same as above, but the truth is, Lovelace isn't exactly good husband material, regardless of what he may think of himself. Probably Edmund, the adult version, from The Chronicles of Narnia, I'm thinking Horse and His Boy time. He's had a chance to learn and grow from life's lessons and to be considerate of others as well as preserve his own identity. He knows first-hand the worst excesses of human nature and he's grown from his experiences.

The character that you love to hate more than any other:
Armand Chauvelin from The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy

The villain that scares you more than any other:
Honestly, I can't think of a scary villain right now.

The book with your favorite plot of all time:
The Three Musketeers By Alexandre Dumas

The author you most wish you could meet:
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. (they didn't say it had to be living.)

The literary character you think you're most like:
I can empathise with a lot of characters in literature, but if I had to pick someone, probably Milo, from The Phantom Tollbooth. He's mild, calm, uninterested, by easily engaged by the things around him when they're interesting enough.

And, finally, what got you hooked on reading:
My parents reading to me. My dad read my bedtime stories and my mother read to me every day. Reading was always something cool that the grownups did. If the answer to this should have been a book, I honestly don't remember the first time I read. I've been reading as long as I can remember.


Saw Idiocracy with Rocker. I think he picked it based on my last post. It was a good choice. Definitely worth watching.

Go Pats!
Current Mood: amusedamused
Current Music: Patriots/Eagles

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